How to do a Clevis Lift in 20 minutes

Discussion in 'How To' started by DaleKJ, Apr 30, 2015.

  1. DaleKJ

    DaleKJ Full Access Member

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    First let me give credit to user TSETS for his idea of using PVC to measure the distance for the lift. Most of this is his work with something I came up with to make it even quicker and easier.
    I liked TSETS plan but I didn't know what size PVC to buy and I don't have the proper tools to cut it exactly 3/8". I would have spent at least 2-3 hours figuring out what size, going to the hardware store, trying to cut two pieces exactly 3/8" and probably redoing it a few times to get it right. So, I thought why mess with it? And, why mess with conduit nuts and have to do extra work getting them in there. They are not there to support weight, only as a measuring device. So what would be an easy way to measure using TSETS idea but without the PVC?
    How about a 3/8" wood chisel? I just happen to buy a set at Harbor Freight a couple of weeks ago so I measured and sure enough it was exactly 3/8". Trying to use a tape measure or caliper would be a pain trying to get it in there to measure and it probably wouldn't be precise. That's why most people use conduit nuts as spacers.
    So using TSETS system and my wood chisel this is how I did it in 20 minutes start to finish, once I gathered my jacks and tools.
    1. Blocked the rear wheels and jacked the entire front at once using my 4 ton Harbor Freight floor jack. Two jack stands for safeties sake.
    2. (The hardest part of the lift) Remove the tires and wheels. I cheated on this part and used an impact wrench.
    3. Pulled off the Teraflex bump stops. Pull toward you from the bottom. No tools required.
    4. Placed a bottle jack between lower control arm/brake rotor with two 2X4s under jack and top part in the space where the bump stops go. Don't worry about the brake rotor, it only took a little bit of pressure to open up the space. No worries.
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    Sorry, I couldn't get this pic to orient in the proper direction
    5. Loosened the upper clevis bolt slightly. Don't loosen too much so that it will lift evenly all the way around. Slowly pumped the jack and the space opened easily without binding. Jacked until I had approximately 3/8" of space between the lower shock seat and the top of the clevis.
    6. Use a 3/8" wood chisel as a measuring device and use the jack up or down as needed to get exactly 3/8". (In my case the neighbor's dog ran off with my chisel so he could chew on the handle. Damned dog. I used a small pry bar instead that also measured 3/8", plus 1/32", so actually 13/32", close enough)
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    7. Tightened the clevis bolt and torqued to 100 Ft.-lbs.
    8. Removed the bottle jack and replace bump stop. I used a little water as a lubricate and popped one in by hand. The other one I had to use my 16" Channel Locks to snap it into place. This is all that is needed even when putting them in for the first time. Takes about 10 seconds. No other lubricates, no soaking, and no boiling required. (not to say those aren't good ideas, just not necessary)
    9. Replace wheel and tire and repeat on the other side.
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    Do what you want to do in the rear. An extra isolator or whatever and don't forget to have alignment adjusted.
    It couldn't be easier or quicker.
     
    Aceofspades likes this.
  2. 4x4kayak2112

    4x4kayak2112 Full Access Member

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    I have donw that for years. I dont see why you need a spacer to conduit nuts other than as a measurement device.
     
  3. tommudd

    tommudd Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Thats all it is and all it ever has been, but cheap way of doing it so you're the same on both sides . Are there cheaper ways? Of course but cutting something to 3/8 of an inch or measuring for some is almost impossible .
    So back to spacers or conduit nuts so they're the same
    ALTHOUGH I never do both sides the same anyways since the drivers side is always a bit lower so I adjust from there:icon_lol:
     
  4. ftaa

    ftaa Full Access Member

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    this all depends on how much your wife weighs and how often she is in the jeep :)
     
  5. DaleKJ

    DaleKJ Full Access Member

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    Clevis Lift for those not mechanically inclined

    This could have been the title or maybe "Clevis lift for the lazy"
    I see your point Tom and I would never even try to debate you about a lift. Hell you basically taught me how to install mine. But from an amateur's perspective...not everyone is comfortable with removing suspension parts. What takes you 5 minutes may take someone else 2 hours and many people are just plain scared to miss with it. Here is a quote from another member about the clevis lift,
    "the correct way is as follows, disconect the swaybar, disconnect the tierod end, disconect the UCA at the ball joint, loosend the clevis fork nut at the strut, and disconnect the fork from the lower control arm. real easy"
    I'm sure it is real easy for many, but to me this sounds like a lot of work to get a little extra lift. Especially since I already installed the OME lift and upper plate. It's really hard to go wrong using a chisel or pry bar to measure the 3/8 of an inch. Easy as pie for just about anyone and much easier than removing and loosening all of those suspension parts, especially if that's all your wanting to do is a simple clevis lift.
    Like someone once said on one of these posts, not a direct quote but close, "you guys make these lifts a lot harder than you need to", referring to the removal of the rear sway bar to place more isolators. I won't mention any names but he is a master when it comes to doing these lifts and his initials are T.M. LOL
    I know people have done this same type of thing a million times but I thought the 3/8" chisel idea might be worth sharing. Really can't screw it up no matter who you are, IMHAO. Thanks
     
  6. tommudd

    tommudd Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Good job / good write up
     
  7. DaleKJ

    DaleKJ Full Access Member

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    Thank you, Tom. You folks have helped me so much with my lift I thought I'd try to give back a little. Nothing new hear except maybe the 3/8" chisel idea. But it's easily searchable anyway. Maybe it will benefit someone.
     
  8. Jo6pak

    Jo6pak Full Access Member

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    Good write up.
    I did basically the same process, but used a 3/8" allen wrench for the measuring. Had to tweak the drivers side to get it level, as Tom mentioned.
     
  9. uss2defiant

    uss2defiant Full Access Member

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    sorry, I dont know much about lifting but why would one want to do this?
    Is this used just to level the jeep?
     
  10. CactusJacked

    CactusJacked Full Access Member

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    It's a cheap and inexpensive (read free) way to get some lift. On average it's a 2:1 lift, so 3/8" clevis gives you 3/4"-ish of lift.
     
  11. twowings

    twowings Full Access Member

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    Even with the correct torque on the clevis bolt, I'm not sure just how much pounding it will take before starting to slide slowly back up the strut...I could be wrong (it's been known to happen!) but I feel better with the conduit nuts in place...then again, I am very old....
     
  12. uss2defiant

    uss2defiant Full Access Member

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    that's my thought too that it would slide back down.
    Also is 3/4" lift really that significant for functionality?
     
  13. mx3_ryder

    mx3_ryder Full Access Member

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    I think that's what these are for.

    http://jeepinbyal.com/clevis-spacer-for-front-struts.html
     
  14. tommudd

    tommudd Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I have ran both ways with mine and a couple of others
    I have ran mine thousands of miles without them sliding back down, ( included on and off road)
    Although I use them on 95 % of the ones we lift here its more convenience than anything PLUS a quick look and you know for sure they have not moved any.
    So like bumpstops, its cheap insurance and in your mind you know nothing is going to happen so that in itself is worth the cost of installing them
     
  15. tommudd

    tommudd Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Yes those are what you would use
    .375 for 3/4 inch lift ( used with OME springs )
    .500 for an inch lift ( used for Ironman springs)
     
  16. tommudd

    tommudd Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I have torn mine apart before to raise it 1/8 inch before to get that extra 1/4 inch over someone else :icon_lol: so yes it is necessary:shrug::happy175::happy175:
     
  17. twowings

    twowings Full Access Member

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    It's a game of inches...:icon_twisted:
     
  18. tommudd

    tommudd Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    We had a lift party going one day ( two lifts and a set of rock rails on another one, Chris and I were doing all of the work. Someone bet us that we couldn't add another 1/4 inch to Chris' so of course it comes in the garage and we tore it apart as well to add that 1/4 inch :happy175:. I knew it would work since mine was already past that :icon_lol:This was back when everyone was saying 2.5 inches was max height that you could lift a KJ:thumbsdown:
     
  19. RenKJ

    RenKJ Full Access Member

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    The conduit nut method is nuts that act like spacers up under the mounting plate where the strut bolts to the engine bay, correct?
     
  20. Gyro

    Gyro Full Access Member

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    The conduit nuts go between the clevis and the shock.
    you put the nut/s on the bottom of the shock then slide it into the clevis.

    Gyro