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How To: (VIDEO) Cycle Fresh Transmission Fluid Through Your System


This is a discussion on How To: (VIDEO) Cycle Fresh Transmission Fluid Through Your System within the How To forums, part of the Jeep Liberty - KJ (02 to 07) category!
Register to remove these ads. It's free! Easy way to cycle fresh transmission fluid through your tranny.... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yn_Nl...e=channel_page First off, ...

In this section it explains how to do installations and modifications.


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Old 02-05-2009, 09:23 PM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Default How To: (VIDEO) Cycle Fresh Transmission Fluid Through Your System


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Easy way to cycle fresh transmission fluid through your tranny....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yn_Nl...e=channel_page



First off, ok8 gets credit for telling me about sucking the fluid out vs installing a drain plug.

Here is what i put in the video description in case you miss it.....
------------------------------------------------------------

"This video shows how to always have fresh fluid going through your transmission instead of adding just 5 quarts or so at each 30K mile filter change. Our Liberty (02-07) transmissions hold a total of 14 quarts(45RFE) or 12 quarts(42RLE) quarts of fluid. It cant be good IMO to let most of the fluid stay in the transmission on the 30K mile schedule. If 5 quarts come out at each filter change, that would mean it would take 90K miles of use (3 filter changes) before the 14 quart capacity was reached, and even then most of the fluid added from the beginning would now be old as well.


The following 2 schedules will vary with how often you change your oil. You dont however, have to do this during oil changes. I just prefer to do so as it only takes a few extra minutes and helps maintain an even schedule.

5000 Mile Schedule.- Use MOPAR ATF+4 Synthetic or equivalent

At each 5K mile reading on the odometer, change your oil and filter as usual. Then pull out 2 quarts of transmission fluid as described in the video and then replace with 2 new quarts. Job is done until the next oil change.

This ensures that at least 10 fresh quarts will be cycled through your transmission before the scheduled 30K mile filter change. When the odometer hits 30K, do your oil/ filter change as usual. Then take off your transmission pan, change your transmission filters and replace pan and gasket/sealant. Dropping the pan will release 4 - 5 quarts of fluid which you will replace until the dip stick says its enough.
Then repeat entire process. until 60K, 90K, 120K miles and so forth.


3000 Mile Schedule - Use MOPAR ATF+4 Synthetic or equivalent

For those of you who change your oil every 3K miles, this follows the same example as above except you would do this at your 3K mile oil change. The only thing I would say different is that you can get away with only pulling out 1 quart at each change instead of 2 quarts. This is because, in this schedule, there will be 9 oil changes up until the 30K mile period so 9 x 1 =9 fresh quarts over that period, and then on the exact 30K mile change, you will have to drop the pan anyway to change your transmission filters and this will be where the last 4 - 5 quarts are exchanged.


Even at that, these schedules are just easy to follow suggestions. You can do this every week if you want, as long as you maintain proper fluid levels, but that would be expensive and pointless.

This can also work with most any transmission if you feel the need to do so. I just dont like the idea of all of that old, worn out fluid staying in the system for as long as it does."

Last edited by flair1111; 03-29-2009 at 11:44 PM.
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Old 02-05-2009, 10:06 PM   #2 (permalink)
 
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Just to note only the 45RFE trans holds 14qts,the 42RLE only holds 12qts.
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Old 02-06-2009, 12:11 AM   #3 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by tjkj2002 View Post
Just to note only the 45RFE trans holds 14qts,the 42RLE only holds 12qts.
Thanks, ill make that correction on my page.

edit- and this might explain why i got exactly 2qts from mine (06) and a bit over 3qts from my wifes (02) when testing how much i could actually suck out just from the dip stick???

Last edited by flair1111; 02-06-2009 at 12:26 AM.
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Old 02-06-2009, 12:56 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Thanks for posting that vid! I'm going to set that up for my next oil change.
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Old 02-23-2009, 10:55 PM   #5 (permalink)
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You must also reset your TCM or the old values for clutch pressure, and indexing will be used. With new fluid all the way through, you can cause damage to the clutches. This is a common overlooked item with the Chrysler Ultradrive Transmission.

These PCMs learn your driving habits along with clutch indexing and pressures. When you "cycle" the fluid, the indexes are not relearned fast enough, it is like progressive learning, and not regressive due to the averaging system used over time of driving. This is why you need to disconnect the batter for 10 minutes to wipe the ECM, so it can relearn. There are two learn processes.

METHOD1:
1. Pull BOTH battery cables completely off of the battery !! - disconnect the cables totally from the Battery and bolt the
cables together - not the battery posts!! (or connect the cables together with jumper cables)
2. Turn the ignition key to the ON position
3. Stand on the brakes
4. Remain in this condition from 5-10 minutes to assure complete draining of all the capacitors in the entire electrical system!
5. Turn the ignition key off.
6. Connect everything back up again, reset your clock and stereo presets.
7. Take the car on the road and jump on it!!
8. Drive the car a little harder than usual for a day or two and you should notice the difference from then on.

Important Retrain Instructions, or after cycling the transmission fluid, or even after a rebuild or replacement.

The Ultradrive transmission was the first to control the release of one gear and the apply of another without the use of bands or sprags. It programs its shifting operation by sampling the vehicle's operation pattern while it is being driven. The sophisticated electronics present some unique installation problems that must be addressed if the transmission is to work properly and last.

This sound, which goes "bzzzz---zz-tic", is completely normal. It's the transmission fluid control solenoid valves opening and shutting rapidly to make the fluid go where it's supposed to go to shift the transmission. All the Ultradrive automatics make this sound with every upshift, every downshift, and every gear selection. You only hear the one as you pull to a stop, because the road and engine noise are minimal at this low speed.

METHOD2:
To prevent 2-3 and 4-3 bindup and/or damage it is VERY IMPORTANT to 'fast re-schedule' the controller before road testing the vehicle. Because the controller will retain the program from the old settings that had old fluid, worn or burnt clutches, it will increase the clutch apply rate. Most controllers won't re-set fast enough to prevent damage to the new clutches. To prevent damage the controller needs a 'fast re-schedule' before the road test.

With the wheels off the ground and the selector in OD position 1) Apply the throttle slowly until a speed of 45 to 50 mph is indicated. 2) Lift the throttle gently and allow the indicated speed to slow to 20 mph. 3) Gently apply the brakes to bring the wheels to a stop.

Repeat this at least 75 times while noticing the feel of the 2-3 shift. When a light throttle 2-3 shift no longer binds up or bogs the engine the transmission is ready to road test.

Take the vehicle on the road. At 38 mph lift the throttle and apply a very small amount of brake. If the 4-3 coast downshift is rough at 20 to 26 mph take the vehicle back up to 38 mph and lift the throttle again. At 32 to 35 mph add just enough throttle to barely make a 3-2 kick down shift. Do this 40 times and re-check for a rough 4-3 coast downshift. If the shift is still rough repeat the 3-2 kick down 40 to 80 times.

This procedure will program the transmission for proper shifts and should be performed whenever the transmission is repaired or replaced and whenever the battery is disconnected. Failure to follow these procedures may result in costly damage to internal components in your replaced transmission.

This seems quite extensive, and you're right, it is. Since the TCM learns your driving habits, you have to do this to make it think this is the way you drive, and the trans will shift accordingly. The more you drive after the learning, the less adaptive it is, since it is based on an averaging scale. The more variables and times that are added to these calculations over time; that are needed to calculate shifting; becomes extensive, and lengthy for the TCM. So there has to be a point where it stops learning, and the shift pattern is set.

This information is from Chrysler Repair Technicians, and is also overlooked by many other non OEM Transmission centers, like Cottman, and Aamco.
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Old 02-23-2009, 11:11 PM   #6 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Powerslave View Post
You must also reset your TCM or the old values for clutch pressure, and indexing will be used. With new fluid all the way through, you can cause damage to the clutches. This is a common overlooked item with the Chrysler Ultradrive Transmission.

These PCMs learn your driving habits along with clutch indexing and pressures. When you "cycle" the fluid, the indexes are not relearned fast enough, it is like progressive learning, and not regressive due to the averaging system used over time of driving. This is why you need to disconnect the batter for 10 minutes to wipe the ECM, so it can relearn. There are two learn processes.

METHOD1:
1. Pull BOTH battery cables completely off of the battery !! - disconnect the cables totally from the Battery and bolt the
cables together - not the battery posts!! (or connect the cables together with jumper cables)
2. Turn the ignition key to the ON position
3. Stand on the brakes
4. Remain in this condition from 5-10 minutes to assure complete draining of all the capacitors in the entire electrical system!
5. Turn the ignition key off.
6. Connect everything back up again, reset your clock and stereo presets.
7. Take the car on the road and jump on it!!
8. Drive the car a little harder than usual for a day or two and you should notice the difference from then on.

Important Retrain Instructions, or after cycling the transmission fluid, or even after a rebuild or replacement.

The Ultradrive transmission was the first to control the release of one gear and the apply of another without the use of bands or sprags. It programs its shifting operation by sampling the vehicle's operation pattern while it is being driven. The sophisticated electronics present some unique installation problems that must be addressed if the transmission is to work properly and last.

This sound, which goes "bzzzz---zz-tic", is completely normal. It's the transmission fluid control solenoid valves opening and shutting rapidly to make the fluid go where it's supposed to go to shift the transmission. All the Ultradrive automatics make this sound with every upshift, every downshift, and every gear selection. You only hear the one as you pull to a stop, because the road and engine noise are minimal at this low speed.

METHOD2:
To prevent 2-3 and 4-3 bindup and/or damage it is VERY IMPORTANT to 'fast re-schedule' the controller before road testing the vehicle. Because the controller will retain the program from the old settings that had old fluid, worn or burnt clutches, it will increase the clutch apply rate. Most controllers won't re-set fast enough to prevent damage to the new clutches. To prevent damage the controller needs a 'fast re-schedule' before the road test.

With the wheels off the ground and the selector in OD position 1) Apply the throttle slowly until a speed of 45 to 50 mph is indicated. 2) Lift the throttle gently and allow the indicated speed to slow to 20 mph. 3) Gently apply the brakes to bring the wheels to a stop.

Repeat this at least 75 times while noticing the feel of the 2-3 shift. When a light throttle 2-3 shift no longer binds up or bogs the engine the transmission is ready to road test.

Take the vehicle on the road. At 38 mph lift the throttle and apply a very small amount of brake. If the 4-3 coast downshift is rough at 20 to 26 mph take the vehicle back up to 38 mph and lift the throttle again. At 32 to 35 mph add just enough throttle to barely make a 3-2 kick down shift. Do this 40 times and re-check for a rough 4-3 coast downshift. If the shift is still rough repeat the 3-2 kick down 40 to 80 times.

This procedure will program the transmission for proper shifts and should be performed whenever the transmission is repaired or replaced and whenever the battery is disconnected. Failure to follow these procedures may result in costly damage to internal components in your replaced transmission.

This seems quite extensive, and you're right, it is. Since the TCM learns your driving habits, you have to do this to make it think this is the way you drive, and the trans will shift accordingly. The more you drive after the learning, the less adaptive it is, since it is based on an averaging scale. The more variables and times that are added to these calculations over time; that are needed to calculate shifting; becomes extensive, and lengthy for the TCM. So there has to be a point where it stops learning, and the shift pattern is set.

This information is from Chrysler Repair Technicians, and is also overlooked by many other non OEM Transmission centers, like Cottman, and Aamco.
Might want to get out of the '80's,Chrysler does not use ultradrive style transmissions anymore.Chrysler uses Mercedes designed transmissions now which does not need any of the above be done to it.There is a simple procedure now that replaces all of that mumbo jumbo if needed,it's called a transmission quick relearn which can be done by the dealership via the DRBIII or StarScan,the OTC Gyensis and most higher end MAC and SnapOn scanners can also activate this feature which is only really needed for the 45RFE/545RFE transmissions after a drain/refill service only and unless you get funny shifting is not really needed,takes about 5 mins max to do this relearn also.
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Old 02-23-2009, 11:28 PM   #7 (permalink)
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The original 42LE was modified in 2003 as the 42RLE, originally for the then-new Jeep Liberty. It is a 42LE transaxle, modified for RWD use by removing the integral differential and transfer chain. Power flow exits the rear of the now transmission. The case has also been modified. This transmission will reportedly remain in production through the end of the decade in several models.

They are not Mercedes transmissions, they are Chrysler.
Application: 2003-present Jeep Liberty.

A606/42LE:
The 42LE was an upgraded version of the 41TE modified for longitudinal engines. It debuted in 1993 on the LH cars. It is strengthened with a reworked final drive unit, barreled axle shafts, and upgraded clutch packs. The major modification to a N-S drivetrain while maintaining front wheel drive was accomplished by adding a differential to the transmission case, which was driven by means of a transfer chain from the output shaft of the low/reverse clutch assembly at the rear of the transmission case.

The Ultradrive and its descendants are produced at Kokomo Transmission in Kokomo, Indiana, not anywhere in Germany.
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Old 02-23-2009, 11:35 PM   #8 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Powerslave View Post
The original 42LE was modified in 2003 as the 42RLE, originally for the then-new Jeep Liberty. It is a 42LE transaxle, modified for RWD use by removing the integral differential and transfer chain. Power flow exits the rear of the now transmission. The case has also been modified. This transmission will reportedly remain in production through the end of the decade in several models.

They are not Mercedes transmissions, they are Chrysler.
Application: 2003-present Jeep Liberty.

A606/42LE:
The 42LE was an upgraded version of the 41TE modified for longitudinal engines. It debuted in 1993 on the LH cars. It is strengthened with a reworked final drive unit, barreled axle shafts, and upgraded clutch packs. The major modification to a N-S drivetrain while maintaining front wheel drive was accomplished by adding a differential to the transmission case, which was driven by means of a transfer chain from the output shaft of the low/reverse clutch assembly at the rear of the transmission case.

The Ultradrive and its descendants are produced at Kokomo Transmission in Kokomo, Indiana, not anywhere in Germany.
The 42LE is not even close to the 42RLE,the 42RLE was based off of the A604,updated by Mercedes when they owned Chrysler and did not appear till '03.Mercedes updated many many of Chrysler's tranny's,including the introduction of the 45RFE and 545RFE,the 68RFE and so on.



Take anything on wikipedia,anyone can change that info at will,with a grain of salt.Most is not true.
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Old 02-24-2009, 02:14 PM   #9 (permalink)
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I would rather have the Mercedes transmission, but, when I put it into drive, I still get the "Bzzzzzzz-tick" sound. That's a Chrysler trademark, really.

I will ask the dealer...

They also use ATF+4 right? IF so, why would Mercedes build a transmission for Chrysler that is depended on a specially formulated fluid again? The reason you have to use the ATF+4 is due to the way the Ultradrive shifts.

If it were REALLY a Mercedes transmission, then any Dextron ATF would work... That's what you use in Mercedes transmissions. If you use Dextron in a Chrysler transmission? Say bye-bye to the clutches...

People always confuse ATF (a dextron type product) with ATF+3, and now +4, and they are NOT the same. Mercedes transmissions use ATF, which is not +3 or +4

I would like CONCRETE proof I do not have a Chrysler Transmission... It Sounds like one, and uses the same fluid as one.

Last edited by Powerslave; 02-24-2009 at 03:37 PM.
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Old 02-24-2009, 08:14 PM   #10 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Powerslave View Post
I would rather have the Mercedes transmission, but, when I put it into drive, I still get the "Bzzzzzzz-tick" sound. That's a Chrysler trademark, really.

I will ask the dealer...

They also use ATF+4 right? IF so, why would Mercedes build a transmission for Chrysler that is depended on a specially formulated fluid again? The reason you have to use the ATF+4 is due to the way the Ultradrive shifts.

If it were REALLY a Mercedes transmission, then any Dextron ATF would work... That's what you use in Mercedes transmissions. If you use Dextron in a Chrysler transmission? Say bye-bye to the clutches...

People always confuse ATF (a dextron type product) with ATF+3, and now +4, and they are NOT the same. Mercedes transmissions use ATF, which is not +3 or +4

I would like CONCRETE proof I do not have a Chrysler Transmission... It Sounds like one, and uses the same fluid as one.
For some time Mercedes and Chrysler where one and the same.Newer Mercedes does not use Dextron ATF,Who do you think came up with the specs for ATF+4?That buzzing is the shift solenoids,common on all electronically controlled transmission,just louder on Chrysler's. You do have a Chrysler transmission,redesigned by Mercedes.Many of Chryslers newer vehicles would have never came around without Mercedes.
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